The forests on the earth absorb 2 billion tons of carbon a year. Each flight into space does have a small impact on the planet it leaves behind, but—for the moment, at least—these launchings are very rare. In recent years a number of space agencies around the world have called for tackling the growing problem of space debris. Upper atmospheric regions of Earth are impacted by human-made space debris.

The space debris issue won't affect me, will it? Space buffs know that Earth orbit is littered with junk, including defunct satellites, spent rocket boosters, and other random debris–about 11,500 objects bigger than 4 inches across, according to NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office (it’s their graphic you’re looking at). But with the deforestation needed for junk mail, there are fewer trees to help reduce greenhouse gases. Actually, as astronomer Mark Thompson explains, it will. Fill … What risks does space junk pose to space exploration? There is no direct effect, although the density of space debris is now so great that astronomical observations are often degraded by it.

The U.S. Space Surveillance Network, a department that tracks debris floating through space and reports to NASA, observes over 13,000 man-made objects orbiting Earth larger than 4 inches in diameter [source: National Geographic News].That number has only been increasing, up from 9,000 objects in 2000. The main problem is that of collisions with operational spacecraft. Space debris does not affect Earth’s environment. Except for the odd piece that survives atmospheric entry, most space junk is incinerated before it can impact (hah - impact) Earth’s environment.

As a result of 50 years of spaceflight, the useful orbits around Earth are littered with derelict satellites, burnt-out rocket stages, discarded trash and other debris.

The loss of 100 million trees a year is a huge blow, experts say. The others, considered as space debris, are today a significant and constant danger for all space missions.

In the United States, NASA’s Orbital Debris Program (ODP) at the Johnson Space Center in Texas, keeps an eye on the ever-expanding junkyard of space. But rest assured: the chances that you'll be hit by any leftover space junk isn't that high. Loss of trees. Nobody knows the extent to which rocket launches and re-entering space debris affect Earth's atmosphere — but such ignorance could be remedied soon. Tracking space trash.

In this context, there is an opportunity to make the link between space debris concern and eco-design of spacecraft (meaning both satellites and launchers) using LCA. The biggest danger it poses is to other satellites in orbit. Rocket launches are nonetheless relatively infrequent, meaning that their overall impact on our climate remains much smaller than aviation’s. The main problem is that of collisions with operational spacecraft. There is no direct effect, although the density of space debris is now so great that astronomical observations are often degraded by it. How does Junk Mail Affect the Environment? With an average impact speed of 10km/s, any piece of debris larger than 1cm in diameter can cause a catastrophic impact. Many rockets are, however, propelled by liquid hydrogen fuel, which produces ‘clean’ water vapour exhaust, although the production of hydrogen itself can cause significant carbon emissions. Space launches can have a hefty carbon footprint due to the burning of solid rocket fuels. But it’s not just our immediate environment: ‘space junk’ is a growing concern as disused satellites and other objects accumulate in our planet’s orbit. Over the past few months, people have captured footage of space debris burning up in our atmosphere. Fortunately, at the moment, space junk doesn't pose a huge risk to our exploration efforts. Here’s a consequence of climate change you probably haven’t thought of.

With an average impact speed of 10km/s, any … Image shows the limb of the Earth at the bottom transitioning into …