Geologic hazard publications may also be available for this county.. General Hazards. Study: Wasatch Front fault lines prone to large earthquakes April 29, 2020 GMT The Utah Department of Natural Resources released new maps accompanied with a four-year study showing there is a significant risk in densely populated and developing areas near active fault lines, KUTV-TV reported. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS), and Utah Division of Emergency Management (UDEM) recently published the Utah Earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary Fault Map (UGS Map 277). 1:250,000, fault location may be inferred or is poorly constrained. 1:50,000, fault should be more continuous than discontinuous and mapping is accurate at <25,000 scale. Lund, W.R., editor, 1986, Engineering geologic case studies in Utah, 1986: Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Special Study 68, 94 p., 16 plates, various scales. Harty, K.N. 1:100,000, fault could be more discontinuous than continuous and mapping is accurate at <50,000 scale. Utah has experienced many earthquakes, large and small, because of its abundance of faults and fault zones. The scenarios include information from the Utah Geological Survey (UGS), the Salt Lake City/County Assessor’s Office, and the Structural Engineers Association of Utah.

Click on the fault lines … Some of the most active faults in Utah include the Wasatch fault along the Wasatch Front, the Hurricane fault in Southern Utah, and the Needles fault zone in Canyonlands National Park. A detailed assessment of the geologic hazards associated with a M 7.0 earthquake on the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault is provided by the UGS located here. About 75 percent of the state's population lives near the 240-mile-long (385 kilometers) Wasatch Fault, according to the Utah Geological Survey. Earthquakes and Surface Fault Rupture. 2020-04-23 06:38:15 UTC 2.1 magnitude, 9 km depth Magna, Utah, United States 2.1 magnitude earthquake 2020-04-23 06:38:15 UTC at 06:38 April 23, 2020 UTC The new map shows earthquakes within and surrounding Utah from 1850 to 2016, and faults considered to be sources of large earthquakes.